Seeing to a distance: Single Channel Video Work From Australia

ARTISTS: JANET BURCHILL & JENNIFER McCAMLEY, PETER BURKE, LISA DETHRIDGE, BHAVANI G.S, PASCALE GOMES-McNABB, STEPHEN HALEY, ROBIN HELY, LILY HIBBERD, LARISSA HJORTH, LOU HUBBARD, DANIUS KESMINAS, NATASHA JOHNS-MESSENGER, LARESA KOSLOFF, DAVID LANS & WARLAYIRTI ARTISTS, HELEN MARCOU & QUINCY McLEAN, AMANDA MORGAN, JAMES MORGAN, MARY LOU PAVLOVIC, DAVID SIMPKIN, KATE SHAW, ELLA & GREG STEHLE, HARRIET TURNBULL, & JAMES VERDON.
ARTIST AND CURATOR: AMANDA MORGAN
akmorgan.com
Level 17 Artspace, Victoria University City Campus, 17/300 Flinders Street, Melbourne 3000
2 August – 26 August, 2011
GALLERY HOURS
Monday – Friday 10am – 5pm
Seeing to a distance: Single Channel Video Work From Australia, is the largest exhibition to showcase pivotal video art from Australia, within an innovative curatorial concept: to present a diverse selection of 24 new digital videos, on 24 retro Cathode Ray Tube televisions.
Seeing to a distance is the first exhibition of its scale to deliberately identify Cathode Ray Tube (CTR) Televisions as a significant device to explore and present current video art. This intentional presentation of high definition video art on a previous generation of technology, is to see what happens when we view contemporary media through a limited and standardized platform.
The format of Seeing to a distance is purposefully un‐cinematic, un‐virtual, and un-projected, and firmly boycotts the use of new immersive technology displays. It comes at a controversial time when ‘Digital is it’ to everyone.
The artists were invited to submit videos in response to an article printed in The Telegraphic Journal and Electrical Review (1889), which described a proposed method to develop a machine that would enable Seeing to a Distance by Electricity. 
Each artist was given an outline of the exhibition’s parameters: that all works would be confined to a 4:3 aspect ratio, and that processing from HD back to play on analog CRT format would result in a loss of image quality.
The works on display reveal the long term power of ephemeral video art, to challenge, convey, and maintain a critical role across Australia’s diverse cultural contexts.
Using methods of research on single channel CRT televisions, Seeing to a distance demonstrates what happens when we see video art situated on a previous generation of technology, while also testing our perception of immediate forms of media through a limited and standardized platform.
Seeing to a distance represents a spectrum of creative responses to Australia’s contemporary visual culture and society within three categories:  Abstract, Act and Interact.